Arboretum and Public Garden partnership brings innovation to UC Davis

Photo of Jack Dangermond at UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden sponsored lecture regarding the future of GIS.

Jack Dangermond describes new GIS technologies changing our world to a crowd of campus and community members.

Jack Dangermond, president and founder of Esri, one of the world’s foremost GIS companies, visited campus on April 26 and invited our community to hear his vision about the future of GIS and launch a ground-breaking Esri-UC Davis pilot project. Dangermond is a longtime partner of the UC Davis Arboretum and supporter of the pioneering work Arboretum staff have completed to make geographic information systems (GIS) accessible to public gardens, parks and zoos all over the world.

Jack Dangermond participates in an Arboretum and Public Garden team discussion about the tools staff propose be included as part of the Ersi-UC Davis pilot project.

Jack Dangermond participates in an Arboretum and Public Garden team discussion about the tools staff propose be included as part of the Ersi-UC Davis pilot project.

Dangermond’s passion for supporting conservation science combined with the Arboretum’s GIS leadership, has led to Esri selecting UC Davis, and its Arboretum and Public Garden, as the site to build a suite of cloud-based mobile GIS tools to manage their organization and campus collections. The new tools that result from this work will be shared with botanical gardens and zoos around the world, to help them understand and protect the earth’s biodiversity as well as educate their 50 million visitors about critical issues in conservation science.

 

The Arboretum’s GIS leadership stems in large part from its staff securing over $850,000 in grant funding over the course of ten years to create a suite of tools, data models, training materials, guides, and peer-to-peer support groups specifically for educating those involved with conservation about best practices for collecting and disseminating information about their collections.

Much of the work involved in this long-term project can be found via the newly-launched Alliance for Public Garden GIS website. If you are interested in finding out more, please visit this new site at: http://publicgardensGIS.ucdavis.edu.

We are excited about the commitment that Esri has made to the future of public gardens and our role in its success. We’ll be sure to keep you up-to-date as the project progresses!

VIEW PHOTO GALLERY from this event.

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