Farmer Fred podcast features our plant sales and staff

Image of Farmer Fred, Ellen Zagory and Taylor Lewis.

Sunday, October 5, 2014, our own Ellen Zagory, director of public horticulture and Taylor Lewis, nursery manager, were featured on Farmer Fred’s radio show “Get Growing with Farmer Fred” on KSTE 650 AM from 10-11:30 a.m.

The three of them discussed a range of gardening topics including water-wise landscaping, planting for pollinators, and last, but not least, the incredible selection of plants we’ll have at our upcoming fall plant sales. LEARN MORE about our seasonal plant sales.

Did you miss the show? No problem!
The spot is currently available for download or streaming on  iTunes.

The episodes are named Get Growing with Farmer Fred 100514 Hr 1 and Get Growing with Farmer Fred 100514 Hr 2. The episodes are organized by release dates; our episode was released on October 5, 2014.

If you have the iTunes application, you can GET  TO THE EPISODES here.

8 Tips for a Successful Plant Sale Shopping Experience

Image of Arboretum volunteer, Kend Linderholm, helping a customer

At the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden seasonal plant sales, not only do we offer the area’s largest selection of attractive, low-water, easy-care, region-appropriate plants including lots of Arboretum All-Stars and California natives, we strive to answer your questions and ensure that you meet your shopping goals. Here are some tips our experienced shoppers already know, but our newer customers may not.

Do you have more tips? Let us know! Leave your comment below.

  1. Receive a discount. Become a member and receive 10% off your plant sale purchases. New members also get a $10 off coupon. Other membership benefits include access to member’s only plant sales, free or discounted entry to other gardens, discounts at our partner nurseries, and more. LEARN MORE.
  2. Grab a cart. If you didn’t bring your own cart, use one of ours! If there are no carts available put your name on the wait list. Listen for your name to be called over the PA while you shop.
  3. Look for orange. Sales help can be found in orange aprons.
  4. Seek expert advice. “Arboretum Experts” are located in the front of our large center aisle. At this sale, local Master Gardeners are located in the front of the nursery in our demo bed courtyard. You can also find representatives from our partner nurseries, information on safe pesticide use,  ”plant doctors” and more.
  5. Check out our inventory. Download our online inventory or you can find copies at our “Arboretum Expert” and “Arboretum Resource” tables in the center aisle. LEARN MORE.
  6. Know your type. Looking for perennials, trees, vines, shrubs, succulents, grasses, bulbs, shade plants, California natives, or California natives for shade? The nursery is organized by category and signs can be found hanging from the nursery rafters.
  7. Find inspiration. Look to our demo beds both inside and just outside the nursery for ideas. Most of these plants are labeled will be for sale.
  8. Discover our gift shop. Buy unique merchandise including jewelry, tote bags and t-shirts. Every purchase supports the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. (Credit cards only at the gift shop.)

Explore the Peter J. Shields oak grove

Photo from the UC Davis Arboretum Peter J. Shields Oak Grove

Get to know oaks from around the world by exploring the UC Davis Arboretum’s Peter J. Shields Oak Grove. Photo courtesy of jdavisphotography.com.

DIRECTIONS
The grove is located just west of the Gazebo, off Garrod Drive on the UC Davis campus.
CLICK HERE for a map.

ABOUT
Thanks to Dr. John M. Tucker, professor of botany, director of the Arboretum (1965-66 and 1972-84), and a prominent oak researcher, the UC Davis Arboretum is home to one of the largest and most diverse oak collections in the country, focusing on trees from the southwest U.S., Mexico, and the Mediterranean region. Our collection includes about 100 species, varieties, and hybrids. Massive heritage valley oaks (Quercus lobata) line the Arboretum waterway, and about 275 evergreen and deciduous oak trees grow in the 10-acre Shields Oak Grove, at the west end of the Arboretum. Many of the oaks in Shields Oak Grove were started in the 1960s from acorns collected from around the world for his research. In 2001, Dr. Tucker created an endowment to help preserve the Grove for future generations.

STORY MAP
Did you know it is home to oaks with acorns as big as golf balls, oaks once grown to build warships, and oaks required to dye the royal robes of European monarchs red? Visitors who explore the “Oaks Gone Wild!” story map will encounter more than interesting horticultural and historical tidbits about these unique trees—the story map also reveals information about the grove’s abundant wildlife and innovative community-created art. Created for the curious visitor as opposed to the seasoned scientist, this story map seeks to engage its audience with tongue-in-cheek titles and short, engaging descriptions paired with enticing photos. Virtual visitors can tour the collection at home on their desktops or access the information upon arriving on site using a data-enabled smart phone or tablet.

Access the SHIELDS OAK GROVE STORY MAP here.

PRESERVING OAKS
In California and worldwide, many oak species are threatened with extinction by urbanization, clearing for agriculture, livestock grazing, overharvesting, and global climate change. A recent global study of oaks found 29 species to be critically endangered or endangered and 27 more species to be vulnerable. In Shields Oak Grove, Santa Cruz Island oak (Quercus parvula) and Brandegee oak (Quercus brandegeei) from Baja California are both considered endangered in the wild.

The UC Davis Arboretum is a member of the North American Plant Collections Consortium (NAPCC) Multisite Oak Collection. We and our partners have committed to maintain our oak collections at the highest horticultural and museum standards to ensure their long-term preservation for research, teaching, and conservation.

SUPPORT OUR OAKS
Consider making a gift to support the work of the UC Davis Arboretum and the Arboretum’s oak collection.

Director of Public Horticulture Ellen Zagory speaks at a press conference in support of homeowners who install water-wise landscaping

Photo of Ellen Zagory speaking in support of drought-tolerant landscapes at a press conference for AB 2104.

On August 14, Ellen Zagory, Director of Public Horticulture, together with Loren Oki, UC Cooperative Extension Specialist in Landscape Horticulture with the Department of Plant Sciences, spoke at a press conference on the steps of the Sacramento capitol in support of Assembly Bill 2104 (authored by Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez). This bill prevents homeowner’s associations from levying fines against residents for installing drought-tolerant landscapes. On Thursday, September 18, 2014, the bill was signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown.

DETOUR on Garrod Drive during road realignment project

Image of the Garrod Drive realignment and parking lot expansion project.

Phase one of the construction currently taking place on Garrod Drive near La Rue Road will provide more parking between Putah Creek Lodge and the Arboretum Teaching Nursery in addition to creating a defined California native plant meadow.

Over the next couple of days  (Friday, September 26, 2014 through early the following week of  September 28, 2014) a portion of Garrod Drive just off La Rue Road leading to the Arboretum Teaching Nursery, will be closed with a detour in place.

Please refer to the map below or CLICK HERE to download a map of the detour.

This work is part of a multi-year plan to improve access and create campus- and visitor-friendly features at the west end of the Arboretum. The area is part of an exciting initiative zone that contains several large, campus-funded projects. The Arboretum and Public Garden team has been working with campus project managers and departments to coordinate and leverage these projects to enhance the visitor experience in the Arboretum.

The Garrod Drive realignment and Putah Creek Lodge parking lot expansion (happening now), will improve access to the Arboretum Teaching Nursery. This lot will feature trees specifically chosen for their ability to tolerate tough, urban conditions, a new bioswale will filter water that runs off from the parking lot, and a California native plant meadow will collect excess water from the entire site while creating wildlife habitat.

READ MORE in UC Davis Dateline.

rd-closure_garrod_sep-25--sep-26

CLICK ON IMAGE to download the larger map.

DETOUR: Path from south Davis to Arboretum closed to bikes and pedestrians

Photo of closed portion of pathway leading from south Davis to UC Davis Arboretum.

The Putah Creek bike path that connects south Davis to the Arboretum will be closed to both bike and pedestrian traffic for three weeks starting Monday, September 22 through Sunday, October 12. During the closure bicyclists and pedestrians will be detoured to the Richards Boulevard undercrossing.

The closure will allow further improvements to be made to the Putah Creek Parkway path on the east side of the bike tunnel. Detour signs will be posted.  When completed, the section of the Putah Creek Parkway between the I-80 undercrossing and the railroad undercrossing will have decomposed granite paths on both sides of the concrete bike path, native grasses, improved habitat for pipevine swallowtail butterflies and other native pollinators and wildlife.

Click for the City of Davis press release about the project.

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