Students install low-water, low-maintenance planting

Photo of students from the Environmental Club at UC Davis

Last Saturday, January 24, 2015, students and members of the Environmental Club at UC Davis assisted staff from the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden (APG) in planting a strip of landscape along the curve of Garrod Drive just outside the Vet Med horse corral and across from our teaching nursery.

This project, the result of a partnership with UC Davis Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) department, will improve erosion, stormwater quality, and reduce the run-off issues that invariably occur as the result of horses and our other four-legged friends rehabilitating nearby.

The plants, paid for by funding from EH&S, were propagated by students and volunteers at our teaching nursery; some were removed from demonstration beds in areas where the plants needed thinning; and a few were donated by our Director of Public Horticulture Ellen Zagory who had some aloes that were getting too big for her yard!

Photo of Jonathan Su demonstrating proper planting techniques.

Jonathan Su, student and intern with the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, leads a demonstration on proper planting techniques for a large group of volunteers working on the new Garrod Drive landscape.

Haven Kiers, special projects manager with the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, landscape architect, and lecturer for UC Davis Landscape Architecture and Environmental Design courses, designed and facilitated the large planting while UC Davis student  Jonathan Su, Arboretum Ambassador and APG intern, educated the large group of enthusiastic volunteers in proper planting techniques.

A huge thank you goes out to Mandy Royal, APG intern and Environmental Club member, for organizing this incredible team of volunteers and facilitating this important environmental improvement.

What’s next? The landscape along Garrod Drive curve is about a third of the way complete. This recently completed portion reflects the style of landscape located along our teaching nursery just across the street; the middle part of this strip will feature some of the plants listed below along with more grasses, while the final piece of this design will conclude with a mixture of grasses including carex, juncus, and Festuca californica.

PLANTING LIST

  1. Hesperaloe parviflora, coral yucca
  2. Salvia greggii San Takao’, San Takao autumn sage
  3. Iris ‘Canyon Snow’, canyon snow Pacific Iris
  4. Neomerica caerulea, walking iris
  5. Aloe spinossisma, spider aloe
  6. Carex divulsa, Berkeley sedge
  7. Eriogonum fasciculatum, California buckwheat
  8. Festuca californica, California fescue
  9. Juncus patens, California grey rush
  10. Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Mozart’, Ed Carman’s rosemary
  11. Muhlenbergia dubia, pine muhly
  12. Saponaria x lempergii ‘Max Frei’, hybrid soapwort
  13. Ceanothus maritimus ‘Valley Violet’, valley violet maritime ceanothus
  14. Teucrium chamaedrys , germander
  15. Elymus condensatus ‘Canyon Prince’, canyon prince wild rye
  16. Nepeta x faassenii, hybrid catmint

LEARN MORE about our campus stormwater quality improvement projects.

PHOTO GALLERY

Member specials at Davis Ace Hardware

Did you know that UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden members are eligible to receive monthly discounts at Davis Ace Hardware? It’s one of our member benefits! (LEARN MORE about how to become a member, the benefits we offer, and how the funds support our programs.)

In addition to discounts on their inventory of Arboretum All-Stars, here’s a list of specials we hope our members are able to take advantage of each month from now through June. Just remind the cashier of your discount by showing your UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden membership card before checking out.

Enjoy!

JANUARY
EB STONE SEED STARTER MIX 12 QT $4.88

A light weight potting mix blended for starting all types of seeds and for root cutting.

AND

10% OFF

- Botanical Interest Flower

- Vegetable and Herbs Seeds

FEBRUARY
3 cu HAPPY FROG SOIL CONDITIONER
Hand crafted in Humboldt County


- Amends Existing Garden Beds

- Improves Aeration and Texture

- Contains Beneficial Microbes

ACE FIBERGLASS HANDLE FORK SPADE $26.88


- 30” Long handle

- Ergonomic D-Handle add’s comfort and control

- Heavy duty fiberglass handle spading fork turns & aerates soil.

MARCH
SUNSET WESTERN GARDEN BOOK $24.99
FELCO PRUNING SHEARS 15% OFF
APRIL
“YOUR CHOICE” $5.88

- EB STONE 4LB ORGANIC TOMATO/VEGETABLE FERTILIZER

- CITRUS FERTLIZER

- 5LB PH ADJUSTER PLUS

EDNA’S BEST POTTING SOIL 1.5 CU FT $6.88

Contains Mycorrhizol Fungi which are benifical organisms that colonize the roots of most plants and become a natural extension of the root system.

MAY
SUNCAST 6.5 CU FT TUMBLING COMPOSTER $89.99

- Tumbling function makes compost in 3-4 weeks

- Galvanized steel stand

- Durable resin construction

- Made in the U.S.A.

RED WIGGLER COMPOST WORMS 300+ $12.88
JUNE
WALLAROO HAT COMPANY QUALITY GARDEN HATS FOR MEN AND WOMEN 15% OFF
LILLY MILLER 20 LB BAG LAWN AND GARDEN FOOD

- Covers up to 4000 sq ft

- Concentrated fast acting ingredients

- A traditional multi-purpose fertilizer used by farmers and gardeners

 

5 steps for establishing drought-tolerant plants

Photo of Stacey Parker planting her front yard with help from Ellen Zagory.

Stacey Parker, GATEways horticulturist, plants her front yard with advice from Ellen Zagory, director of public horticulture. Stacey started the process of removing her front yard last spring and began planting with low-water plants for shade last fall.

by Ellen Zagory, Director of Public Horticulture

Plants are curious creatures. Unlike us, they cannot get up and get a drink of water when they are parched. By nature, they are rooted to the spot and rely on Mother Nature or a nearby gardener to supply water.

When any plant—including one labeled “drought tolerant”—is planted, its roots extend only as far as the potting soil in which it came. Over the next few months, new roots will begin to grow into the surrounding soil. During the first winter, any new plant will need regular soil moisture to establish a root system. This requires the gardener to be vigilant in monitoring the young plant, the temperature, the wind, and the amount of rain, and supplying moisture when the plant needs it.

Here are five tips for establishing new plants to make your garden truly drought tolerant:

1. Plant in fall because, as the weather cools and the rains come, evaporation is reduced and soil holds moisture longer. Therefore, your new plants will need to be watered less often. If drought continues, you will need to water just enough to keep the plant from wilting. (Planting in spring is good too, but just expect to use more water to get the plants established.)

2. Water deeply and frequently the first dry summer season. In warm weather, recently planted plants may need to be irrigated as frequently as every other day, especially if it is windy. The roots of a young plant need moisture to grow out into the surrounding native soil. Growing a large root system the first season will help the plant survive the next year as irrigation is reduced.

3. Distribute irrigation water evenly, being sure to wet the soil ball from the container as well as the surrounding few inches of native soil all around the plant. Plants cannot move water from one side to the other. If you water only one side, you will have growth only on one side. Watch for wilting and water if needed.

4. Reduce irrigation frequency the second summer, but apply enough water to wet the top 18 inches. Apply water slowly so that it penetrates into the soil and does not run off. In heavier clay soils, water should be applied slowly, over a long period, to penetrate the entire root zone. If runoff is a problem, run short applications of water, let the water soak in and repeat.

5. Cover the soil with a thick layer of organic mulch, like wood chips, to reduce evaporation, smother weed seedlings, keep the soil cool, and reduce erosion.

Boat dock removed from Arboretum waterway

Photo of boat dock removal from the UC Davis Arboretum waterway.

Staff from UC Davis Civil and Industrial Services remove the dilapidated boat dock from the Arboretum waterway.

Today, January 9, 2015, a team from UC Davis Civil and Industrial Services, led by Matt Hayes, operations engineer, removed the old Arboretum boat dock. It’s been hanging on for quite some time, but uneven, shaky footing combined with rotting wood and a weak attachment to land made the dock too unsafe for our visitors.

“It was an interesting experience floating the dock down the waterway then forklifting it out of the water all the time hoping it didn’t come apart,” said Cliff Contreras, director of transportation, airport, and parking services and civil and industrial services for UC Davis.

Will it be replaced? The answer right now is no, however, we’re currently working on re-imagining the entire Arboretum waterway and hope to include places, like this one, where visitors can get closer to nature.

READ MORE in UC DAVIS DATELINE

SEE PHOTOS

2014 annual appeal supports free family programs

 watenpaugh family

The Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden support group raises funds to invest in key areas of the Arboretum and Public Garden’s work. This year, public programs for families are the focus of the Friends annual appeal.

The Arboretum and Public Garden’s events calendar is filled with free family programs that connect children and adults with the environment and showcase the work of UC Davis students and scientists. These inviting, interactive, and educational programs for the public are created by student leaders, such as the Arboretum Ambassadors, working in partnership with the Arboretum and Public Garden’s education staff.

Heghnar Watenpaugh, who attends programs frequently with her husband and children, says,

The Arboretum Ambassadors put on wonderful programs for families. Through their programs, we’ve learned to appreciate different aspects of the environment—from majestic oaks to tiny native bees. These programs teach our kids that nature is interesting and fun, but also that we have the responsibility to care for nature, and that every creature and plant plays a role—not just the cute ones.

Help make an impact—one family at a time. Please consider a gift to the Friends annual appeal.

Please consider a gift to support free family programs in the Arboretum and other GATEway Gardens across the UC Davis campus. Thank you.

GIVE NOW

annual-appeal-coverLEARN MORE
Download the “Discover Nature Together” brochure

 

 

 

 

GIVE
Online: Make an online donation here.
Email: Download this form and email it to arboretum@ucdavis.edu
Mail: Download this form and mail it to:

Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum
c/o UC Davis Arboretum
One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616

Season’s greetings and happy new year!

Photo of year-end collage.

Click to see a larger version of this image.

Thanks to the support and interest of people like you, 2014 proved to be another exciting year for the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. We hope you stay involved because we’re planning more of the same for 2015! Happy new year everyone!

TOP TO BOTTOM AND LEFT TO RIGHT:

  • Top left: Through collaborations on campus and in our region, we continued to improve landscapes and landmarks like the community-designed and community-created bike tunnel mural in our Arboretum GATEway Garden. READ MORE
  • Middle left: Academic collaborations enlivened our gardens with art like the student-crafted, solar-lit sculptures created from recycled materials. READ MORE
  • Bottom left and top middle: Several student-led programs involving diverse partnerships allowed families the opportunity to discover nature and science together.
  • Middle center: Our water-wise landscaping experts assisted with California’s drought state of emergency. READ MORE
  • Bottom middle: Enhanced educational exhibits in our Geology GATEway Garden enticed visitors of all ages. READ MORE
  • Top right: Our landscape operations team received a four out of four star accreditation for their outstanding business, social, and sustainability practices from the Professional Grounds Management Society. READ MORE
  • Middle right: Our Arboretum Ambassadors, student interns specializing in environmental leadership, earned a campus community service award as well as President Obama’s Volunteer Service Award. READ MORE
  • Bottom right, left: Student learning opportunities coincided with landscape improvements along Arboretum Drive.
  • Bottom right: Volunteers supported our successful plant sale fundraising events and assisted with the personal shopper benefit we offer high-level members of the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden.

 

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